Jeff Ballard Trio with Miguel Zenón & Lionel Loueke

Jeff Ballard Trio with Miguel Zenón & Lionel Loueke

 
Jeff Ballard Trio

w/ Miguel Zenón & Lionel Loueke

Wednesday, June 11, 7:00pm · 8:30pm
at SFJAZZ Center, Joe Henderson Lab

Jeff Ballard Trio
SOLD OUT! - Check for turn-back tickets on day of performance.

Jeff Ballard Trio

Pulling together the flavors and influences from their respective homelands, this all-star trio explores the common ground of deep grooves, soulful melodies and fiery interplay. Led by Santa Cruz-born drummer Jeff Ballard, the band includes Beninese guitar star Lionel Loueke and Puerto Rican saxophonist Miguel Zenón, three adventurous artists who have transcended traditional jazz roles to create highly personal approaches. Ballard is one of the most original and inventive drummers in modern jazz, veteran of work with Chick Corea, Joshua Redman and Danilo Perez, and a decade-long member of Brad Mehldau’s vaunted trio. Zenón is a Grammy-nominated bandleader, a founding member of the SFJAZZ Collective, a recipient of both a Guggenheim Fellowship and a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant, and an SFJAZZ Resident Artistic Director. Loueke is easily one of the most identifiable and esteemed guitarists in jazz, best known as a member of Herbie Hancock’s working band, for his work with Terence Blanchard, and his seven acclaimed sessions as a leader. The trio’s debut album, Time’s Tales, was recently released on Sony’s revived OKeh label and includes a suitably diverse range of material including Iranian folk melodies, a classic jazz torch song and an ingeniously transformed version of “Hangin’ Tree” by rock band Queens of the Stone Age. Of the album, All About Jazz said: “Time's Tales isn't just a strong debut and a charged trio date; it's an "Album Of The Year" contender.”

Artist Personnel

Jeff Ballard drums, percussion
Miguel Zenón alto saxophone
Lionel Loueke guitar, vocals

Artist Website

"The most exciting trio to emerge in recent memory. " — All About Jazz
"One plus one plus one equals infinite options " — The New York Times